Nikolaus Reis, portrait photo from around 1930.

(Nuremberg City Archives, C21/VII No. 125)

Lina Reis, portrait photo from around 1930.

(Nuremberg City Archives, C21/VII No. 125)

Celtisstrasse 3 is circled in red. The block of houses no longer exists. Today, the Südstadtpark (southern city park) is located here. To the east of Celtisstrasse, the Celtis Tunnel passes under the tracks of the main railway station, which can be seen in the top right-hand corner of the picture. Aerial photo 1927.

(Nuremberg City Archives, A 97 No. 355)

Nikolaus and Lina Reis

Location of stone: Celtisstrasse 3 District: Steinbühl
Sponsors: Schoschana Eschkol and Alice Zimbalist Laying of stone: 3 October 2012

Biographies

On 3 October 2012 Gunter Demnig laid two stumbling stones for Nikolaus and Lina Reis, who were murdered in Theresienstadt and Auschwitz. Schoschana Eschkol and Alice Zimbalist sponsored the laying of the stone.

Nikolaus was the son of Moritz Reis, a man of independent means, and his wife Amalie (née Rosenau). He was born on 20 June 1873 in Meiningen. Nikolaus worked in Nuremberg as a trader.

On 23 August 1906 he married Lina Ullmann from Nürnberg. Lina was born on 7 February 1884. Her parents were Wilhelm und Sabine (née Schopflocher).

The couple had two daughters: Lotte (born 13 July 1907) und Grete (born 15 March 1915).

Lotte married trader Leo Adler on 3 July 1930. Leo came from Vienna. After marrying, they moved to Munich. They emigrated to the USA in the 1930s.

Grete emigrated to Palestine in October 1935.

Nikolaus und Lina were deported to Theresienstadt concentration camp on 10 September 1942. Nikolaus was murdered there on 13 March 1943. Lina was murdered in Auschwitz, after being deported to the camp on 18 May 1944.

- Nuremberg City Archives, C 21/X No. 7 registration cards.

- Nuremberg City Archives (ed.), Gedenkbuch für die Nürnberger Opfer der Schoa (Quellen zur Geschichte und Kultur der Stadt Nürnberg, vol. 29), Nuremberg 1998, p. 275f.

- Nuremberg City Archives (ed.), Gedenkbuch für die Nürnberger Opfer der Schoa, supplementary volume (Quellen zur Geschichte und Kultur der Stadt Nürnberg, vol. 30), Nuremberg 2002, p. 47.